One Girl’s Take on CES 2016

One Girl’s Take on CES 2016

January 19, 2016 |

The SunPort team manning a booth in Eureka Park

The SunPort team manning a booth in Eureka Park

So this was my 2nd year attending CES, the worlds largest Consumer Electronics Show, and it was still one of the most overwhelming events I have ever attended in my life. With over 3,800 exhibitors in 2.47 million sq. ft. of exhibit space and over 170,000 attendees from all over the world, CES was mentioned 6.5 times per second on Twitter during the duration of the conference (hashtag: #CES2016). As I’m sure you heard, there were some major announcements including Tesla’s latest competition, Faraday, and Oculus announcing its $600 price point for their Rift virtual reality system.

Everybody wants to be 100% Solar

Everybody wants to be 100% Solar

Wearables and connected homes continued to be front and center. When learning about connected devices in the home, I heard a stat from Qaulcomm who was displaying the latest in wireless routing power who said that in 2014 people had 9 connected devices and that will go up to 20 connected devices in 2020. The new smart fridge from Samsung received a huge amount of attention with its ability to take a picture of the contents of the fridge each time closed, allowing you to view the image from the grocery store. Drones were all the rave, as expected, but I didn’t think they would feature a drone that can carry a passenger. One of the most exciting opportunities was our partnership with drone pilot Jon Casey to fly a 100% solar-powered drone using our SunPort. He flew at the XDC Races at CES. Drone racing is new but quickly growing. The best part is that this top drone pilot is from Albuquerque! I wrote about Jon in a previous post.

XDC Drone Pilot Jon Casey

XDC Drone Pilot Jon Casey

Besides the announcements by big names, what resonated with me is the smaller but impactful innovations like the winners of the 2016 Appreneur Scholar Award Winners. These are teen founders! Voice is an app that allows user to take a picture of anything that has words on it, and reads that text aloud. People with visual impairment or dyslexia snap a photo of anything and have it read in a matter of seconds in over 30 different languages. You can see more about these teen founders at appreneurscholars.com.